Sunday, 3 October 2010

Crude Awakening

The Crude Awakening
A mass action to switch off oil

Saturday 16 October 2010
| Central London

Floods in Pakistan, drought in Russia, huge glaciers breaking up in Greenland... Our climate system is rapidly sliding into crisis, as oil companies destroy people's lives and the environment to keep sucking up their profits.

Oil saturates every aspect of our lives. Oil profits lubricate the financial markets and its sponsorship clings like a bad smell to our cultural institutions. It flows through pipelines to the pumps, airports and factories of our cities.

The failure of the UN COP15 process showed us – if there was ever any doubt – that government and industry can’t tackle climate change. It’s up to us and it’s time to up the ante. As a movement, our actions against coal and aviation have made a real difference. Now oil’s time is up.

Together, on October 16, let's give the oil industry a Crude Awakening. Meet in central London. Be ready to move, to HOLD A SPACE and to leave that space in a way that shows we've been there.

Be creative. Be prepared. Be there.

Find out more, get involved and sign up for text alerts at:
Twitter: @crudeawake

Part of the Climate Justice Action global week of action for climate justice.
Supported by: Space Hijackers, Climate Camp, Plane Stupid, Rising Tide, Liberate Tate, Laboratory of Insurrectionary Imagination, UK Tar Sands Network and Earth First

See you on the streets

Crude Awakening

1 Comment:

Rajan Alexander said...

NGOs have moved from back stage to centre stage in world politics, and are exerting their power and influence in every aspect of international relations and policy making. They have in most part, been a positive force in domestic and international affairs. However, in recent times, various global Climate Justice Networks have popped up. These are platforms mainly constituted and controlled by Northern NGOs.

We as member of the NGO fraternity or general public seldom research their record of accomplishment; or ask awkward questions on northern NGOs policies; or chase facts behind their claims and publicity spin. One of the most basic questions as we dig deeper is what kind of credentials do these northern NGOs possess to champion justice issues. Simply put - are they committed to principles of justice as portrayed in their carefully cultivated public image?

If we go back to history, what we find is that they have a chequered past in terms of justice credentials. Rwandan Genocide until now had been regarded as the worst shame of NGO behaviour. This was genocide where an estimated 800,000 were massacred. The nineties saw NGOs soul-searching on such behaviour even as today NGO workers remain mentally scarred of experiences such as Rwanda. Apparently lessons have not been learnt as we find that through their climate advocacy they have not repeating the mistakes of the past but the shame hit a new low.

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